The Morning News

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Evan Richards works at The Chronicle, his hometown newspaper. He’s been there for 20 years, moving his way up from a scrawny college intern to middle-aged Editor-in-Chief. He’s proud of his work and the work of his reporters.
Evan is always the first person at the office, usually arriving around 3 a.m. He likes to make sure the papers are ready for delivery. He also loves to be the first person to read the morning paper. This morning is no different, except he’s an hour later than usual. His alarm didn’t go off. He was woken by his chocolate lab, Ralphie, who is used to his morning walk schedule.
Evan arrives at work and sees the pile of freshly printed newspapers waiting to be delivered, the smell of concentrated paper and ink loomed near the stack. Evan loves that smell. He smiles proudly and walks into his office to put his things down. He hangs his hat and jacket on his coatrack in the corner. He sets his briefcase to the left of his desk. He sits in his chair for five minutes to drink his first cup of coffee which he always brings with him from home. Then, he gets up and walks back to the stack of newspapers, grabs one, and walks back to his desk. He tosses the paper on his desk before he walks around and sits in his chair again.
Evan pours himself his second cup of coffee from the office coffeemaker that’s set on a timer to begin brewing at 2:30 a.m. He sips from his cup as he reads the headline on the front page:
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF LATE TO WORK
Evan spits his coffee all over the page. After a few seconds he wipes the coffee off with the sleeve of his shirt and reads the article which he’s sure wasn’t what had been sent to print.
Evan Richards works at The Chronicle. He’s been here for 20 years, moving his way up from a scrawny college intern to middle-aged Editor-in-Chief. He’s proud of his work and the work of his reporters.
Evan puts the paper down, gulps the rest of his coffee, and decides to read some more. Maybe he’s not awake enough.
Richards is always the first person at the office, usually arriving around 3 a.m. He likes to make sure the papers are ready for delivery. He also loves to be the first person to read the morning paper. This morning was no different, except he was an hour later than usual. His alarm didn’t go off. He was woken by his golden retriever, Ralphie, who is used to his morning walk schedule.
Evan notes a few more errors as he reads until he gets to a line halfway through the article that reads:
Richards was unsure whether his copy of the paper was a prank.
Evan puts the paper down and begins to wonder if the paper was a prank. The article has a few discrepancies in the content: his briefcase being on the right side of his desk, his jacket being on his chair, and his first cup of coffee being from the office coffeepot. But how does his paper realize he would wonder if the paper was a prank before he did? Evans looks down and reads the next few line:
Richards then ran to the large pile of papers in the front of the office to see if they all read the same. They did. That’s when Richards felt the pain in his chest.
Evan stares between his paper and the stack of papers sitting in the entryway. He takes one step toward the other papers then remembers the note of pains in his chest. He also remembers the minor discrepancies in the article. He continues to the stack of papers but stops just out of readability view. He feels a tightness in his chest. Though, he’s unsure whether he really feels the chest pain. Is the paper wrong again? Is he going to have chest pains before he reads the other papers? Is this really happening? His thoughts swirl until he no longer understands them.
After an unknown amount of time, Evan sees the lights in the entryway turn on. One of the reporters, Jameson, walks past and stops when he sees Evan sitting on the floor with his back pressed to the side of the stack of papers. Jameson asks Evan what’s wrong. Evan points to the papers and tells him to read the headline aloud.
“7.2 MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKE HITS CALIFORNIA,” Jameson states. Evan stands and grabs the paper from Jameson’s hands. He still sees “EDITOR-IN-CHIEF LATE TO WORK”.

Exercise One
Cherry never had luck with relationships. Either no one was interested, or worse yet, like now, they were very controlling.
No one knew. She never talked about it. “You two always look so happy together,” her friends would say. “He’s perfect,” her parents said. “When’s the wedding?” was the general question on everyone’s lips. Cherry would smile and half-heartedly laugh while Mark slipped his arm around her waist. He’d kiss the top of her head and pull her in too close. The force of his head hurt her waist.
Day after day Cherry and Mark went home together, the façade still going strong, until they walked over the threshold into their home.
“I don’t like the way Martha’s boyfriend looks at you in that shirt. Take it off and throw it away.” It wasn’t a request. It never was.
But Cherry liked that shirt. She’d had it for years. The black, scoop-neck t-shirt fit her perfectly. The splatter of color mixed with glitter was as unpredictable as she had been. It was her favorite. She didn’t want to get rid of it. There was nothing wrong with it, she decided.

Exercise 2
Evan Richards works at his hometown newspaper. He’s worked there for 20 years, working his way up from a scrawny college intern to middle-aged Editor-in-Chief. He’s proud of his work and the work of his reporters.
Evan is always the first person at the office, usually around 3 a.m. He likes to make sure the papers are ready for delivery. He also loves to be the first person to read the morning paper. This morning is no different, except he’s an hour later than usual. His alarm didn’t go off. He was woken by his chocolate lab, Ralphie, who is used to his morning walk schedule.
Evan arrives at work and sees the pile of freshly printed newspapers waiting to be delivered. He smiles proudly and walks into his office to put his things down. His hat and jacket are put on his coat stand in the corner. He sets his briefcase to the left of his desk. He sits in his chair for five minutes to drink his first cup of coffee. Then, he gets up and walks back to the stack of newspapers, grabs one, and walks back to his desk. He tosses the paper on his desk before he walks around and sits in his chair again.
Evan takes a sip of his second cup of coffee as he reads the headline on the front page:
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF LATE TO WORK
Evan spits his coffee all over the page. After a few seconds he wipes the coffee off with the sleeve of his shirt and reads the article which he’s sure wasn’t what had been sent to print.
Evan Richards works at his hometown newspaper. He’s worked there for 20 years, working his way up from a scrawny college intern to middle-aged Editor-in-Chief. He’s proud of his work and the work of his reporters.
Evan puts the paper down, drinks the rest of his coffee, and decides to read some more. Maybe he’s not awake enough.
Evan is always the first person at the office, usually around 3 a.m. He likes to make sure the papers are ready for delivery. He also loves to be the first person to read the morning paper. This morning is no different, except he’s an hour later than usual. His alarm didn’t go off. He was woken by his chocolate lab, Ralphie, who is used to his morning walk schedule.
Exercise 3
Everyone’s skin is marked with tattoos when significant life events happen. The events range from first crush to learning to ride a bike to watching a loved one die. A select few are born with tattoos already on their skin. Sasha was born with three tattoos already on her. The doctors were puzzled. No child had ever been born with that many. Tests after test after test was performed, but nothing came up. Sasha’s parents were finally allowed to take her home.
As she grew up, she didn’t get as many tattoos as other children her age. Though her tattoos tended to be larger and more colorful when she got them. When her parents asked her what the tattoos meant, she couldn’t tell them. She didn’t know.
When Sasha was 16, her parents took her to another doctor to see if they could figure out why she didn’t get as many tattoos other people even though she’d been born with three. The moment the doctor walked in, a new large tattoo appeared on Sasha’s arm.
Self – Analysis
I chose the second exercise because it was the only one I could get a clear vision on. Exercises one and three just weren’t going the way I wanted. I also felt like I had less idea what I was doing for them in the first place. After a little reflecting, I have an idea of what I could do with exercise one, but I don’t believe I would be able to do well with it.
I felt like my writing wasn’t too bad for a first attempt at these genres. I am a writing major. However, I don’t tend to write these types of fiction. My passion lies in romance. So these stories have been challenging for me. I’m also not used to thinking about a story at the spur of the moment. This is also another reason why I chose the second exercise; the idea came easier and more coherently for a think-on-my-feet writing exercise.
I received a little critique, most of it was positive. We ran out of time to get my story properly critiqued in my group, since I was the fourth story read out of four. With the few pieces of helpful critique, I decided to take it. One was keeping the ending the way it was. The other was to expand on a certain section, which I had planned to do anyway.
In future stories, I want to expand on sensory details. I feel that this story lacked that, though I’m unsure where I could improve on it at the moment. The small details needed to be important, so I feel as if major sensory descriptions would have taken away from the effect. I also want to create a more complete character. But again, this story didn’t really need too much of the characters.

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